Happy New Year!

Some nice weather recently gave me an opportunity to see what was happening in the garden, a place I pretty much avoid in winter unless I am picking some greens or herbs, or closing the greenhouses on sub-freezing days. It made me wistful, but not sad. It is nice to have a break, and soon enough I will be assessing my seed needs and trying to figure out where in my tiny house to start seeds under grow lights.

Dinosaur/lacinato kale under row cover

Dinosaur/lacinato kale under row cover

My neighbors must love me.

My neighbors must love me.

lovely lettuce in the greenhouse

lovely lettuce in the greenhouse

Korean radishes

Korean radishes

Not Ready for Fall, Apparently

Well, not for blogging, anyway, but I am still here and even doing some occasional gardening. The garden has reached a point where the changes are incremental and only reveal themselves long term. A lot of my work now needs to be related to photo organization and maintenance. Since my photography skills are lacking, and it is not that fascinating to see compost piled on perennial beds, there is just not much to report lately. I hope to do some analysis of some of the garden beds soon and also report on an unintended benefit of having a large garden--wildlife! Stay tuned for my adventures in winter gardening, too!

Ready for Winter

The Brassicas are doing their thing--the many seeds that I let drop are germinating, or else the plants are sending up new shoots. Kale is supposedly a biennial, but I could swear that this one has been around longer than that and just keeps coming!

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Brussels sprouts sending up side shoots

Brussels sprouts sending up side shoots

Squash Success!

Despite the reputation of summer squash as an over exuberant producer, I have never had much luck. There is not enough for me, forget leaving baskets on neighbor's porches! This year I finally did something right--maybe it was the Garden-tone?

This was the last of my lemon squash seed, which I pretty much just planted to get rid of it. Funny how that works.

There are some other squash varieties in this bed, and they will all eventually succumb to powdery mildew, but I am encouraged to keep trying with squash. Even though it is so easy to grab at the farmers' market, I like growing unusual varieties of squash, after last having success with north Georgia candy roaster, a variety somewhat similar to candy roaster. Next year, I have some Baker Creek specials in store.

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Dinkydo 2014 tomato report

The tomatoes have been slow in coming but are getting steadier everyday. I can't wait to see how these "Virginia sweets" look--yellow with red streaks--and taste.

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The plants look so healthy but have not been very productive.

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I can't resist black tomatoes, but with these black prince, cracking and green shoulders are part of the deal.

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Arkansas traveler is one of the best performers I've grown. The perfect size and not a blemish on them! Pink tomatoes are my second favorite color tomato.

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More black tomatoes, this time the sweetest black cherries. Picking them before they get all their color is mandatory to keep the catbirds from eating them.

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