Ready for Winter

The Brassicas are doing their thing--the many seeds that I let drop are germinating, or else the plants are sending up new shoots. Kale is supposedly a biennial, but I could swear that this one has been around longer than that and just keeps coming!

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Brussels sprouts sending up side shoots

Brussels sprouts sending up side shoots

Squash Success!

Despite the reputation of summer squash as an over exuberant producer, I have never had much luck. There is not enough for me, forget leaving baskets on neighbor's porches! This year I finally did something right--maybe it was the Garden-tone?

This was the last of my lemon squash seed, which I pretty much just planted to get rid of it. Funny how that works.

There are some other squash varieties in this bed, and they will all eventually succumb to powdery mildew, but I am encouraged to keep trying with squash. Even though it is so easy to grab at the farmers' market, I like growing unusual varieties of squash, after last having success with north Georgia candy roaster, a variety somewhat similar to candy roaster. Next year, I have some Baker Creek specials in store.

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Dinkydo 2014 tomato report

The tomatoes have been slow in coming but are getting steadier everyday. I can't wait to see how these "Virginia sweets" look--yellow with red streaks--and taste.

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The plants look so healthy but have not been very productive.

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I can't resist black tomatoes, but with these black prince, cracking and green shoulders are part of the deal.

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Arkansas traveler is one of the best performers I've grown. The perfect size and not a blemish on them! Pink tomatoes are my second favorite color tomato.

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More black tomatoes, this time the sweetest black cherries. Picking them before they get all their color is mandatory to keep the catbirds from eating them.

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Vole Madness

Field mice, aka voles, have been a constant presence in our yard. They mostly seemed to hang out near the compost pile, and I figured better there than in the garden. I was not seeing an epidemic of rootless, dying plants. So, there has been little reason to attack them--after all, all they have to do to escape is run under the fence. Cats, hawks, and foxes have always managed to keep them in check. This year has been different. Every time we venture outside, we see them scurrying. As a nearly 30-year vegetarian, I am loathe to handle mouse traps. Neither is Mr. Do. We may have to reconsider, but for now I am trying a repellent--so look out, neighbors!

Progress report: So far, there has been a slight reduction in vole activity in the treated areas. This stuff does absolutely nothing to repel rabbits, though--right after applying it (and watering as directed), I saw a rabbit right on top of a treated area!